Training Profiles

Lindsey Stuart

  • OSCB - Designated Lead Safeguarding and statutory refresher Training
  • OSCB - Inter-Agency and statutory refresher Training
  • OSCB – Specialist Safeguarding Training
  • OSCB – Prevent
  • Relate - OCN Accredited Counselling Skills for Non Counsellors
  • CCMH - Enabling Children to talk about Feelings
  • Family Links - Parenting group leaders training
  • BSA Pastoral Care and Young People in Boarding Schools - Professional Development Certificate at HE3, BSA, Roehampton University
  • BSA - Management Issues
  • British Dyslexia Association - What's the score? Music & Dyslexia; Theory & Practice
  • OSCB - CAF/TAC Training
  • Optimus - Protecting Children Update Conference

Bruce Anderson

  • OSCB - Specialist Safeguarding Training
  • Working with Troubled and Troublesome Boys
  • Family Links - Parent Group Leader Training
  • OSCB - CAF/TAC Training
  • OSCB – Prevent
  • Mindfulness in Schools Conference
  • Pastoral Conference - Caring to Achieve @ King's College Junior School

Sue Riley

  • OCSB - Designated Lead (Specialist Level 3) Safeguarding Training
  • OSCB - Generalist Safeguarding Training
  • OSCB – Prevent
  • OSCB CAF and TAC training
  • Values-Based Education - David Hanson, IAPS Chief Exec & Roy Leighton, Independent Thinking

Annie McNeile

  • OCSB - Designated Lead (Specialist Level 3) Safeguarding Training
  • OSCB - Generalist Safeguarding Training
  • OSCB – Prevent
  • OSCB CAF and TAC training
  • Family Links – Parenting Puzzle
  • Family Links - Parent Group Leader Training

Ellen Fowler

  • OCSB - Designated Lead (Specialist Level 3) Safeguarding Training
  • OSCB - Generalist Safeguarding Training
  • OSCB – Prevent
  • OSCB CAF and TAC training

School and Home Working Together

This is a new section that sets out how school and home can work together to support children; the subjects are those that parents discuss with us commonly. Currently the following are covered: falling out with friends, body image, racist and sexist language and behaviour, no time for breakfast, We welcome any other topics you would like us to cover.

Falling out with friends:

We can help children learn about healthy relationships
Home
School
  • Empathise with your child's anxiety ie. acknowledge child's big feelings first
  • Reassure your child that this is a normal part of relationships as you grow up
  • Think together how each child might have been feeling ( recognising that we are just guessing)
  • Think together about how to manage next day at school, being kind, saying sorry, spending time with others, expressing your feelings
  • Rehearse conversations your child might have eg " I' m not comfortable when you say/ do that" "I'm sorry we fell out let's play happily together today"
  • Remind your child who can they talk to at school and inform your child's Tutor
  • Try to model to your children that when the issue is resolved that parents, teachers and children can leave it behind.
  • Listen to the child
  • Help the child to express how the child is feeling by using Fl steps for empathy
  • Listen to all children involved using FL steps without judgement
  • Communicate with parents of all children involved
  • Remind children of Dragon values kindness respect and courage
  • Provide support for all children and agree the way forward
  • Observe and Monitor relationship dynamics
  • Check back with individual or groups of children on a regular basis to see how everyone is feeling

Too fat, too thin, too tall, too short?

We can help children to learn to like and accept their bodies
Home
School
  • Help to contain your child's anxiety by reassuring yourself that it is normal and healthy that children's body shape and size constantly as they grow up
  • Be positive about your own body and kind and accepting about other peoples (adult and children)
  • Show your child links to current campaigns
  • Discuss with your child how the media bombards us with a false reality of what beauty
  • Eat together as a family and ensure your child eats enough for a growing developing body and brain
  • If your concerns remain talk it through with someone at school
  • Reinforce a positive culture of acceptance of physical varieties
  • Pick up and challenge any unkind or judgemental comments by anyone, child or adult, in or out of school
  • Reassure the child by explaining it is normal and healthy that body shapes change eg children can lay down extra fat and require more food before their growth spurt in adolescence
  • Discuss with the child how Media bombards us with a false reality of beauty
  • Refer concerns over children’s comments to Head of Year so it can be picked up in circle time or assembly etc
  • Use all support in school, Tutors, Head of Years, Pastoral Team, Nurses to support the child
  • Refer concerns re unhealthy relationships to food to Safeguarding Team for advice and support

Racist remarks and behaviour:

We can help children respect other people's culture, religion, colour, customs and understand how hurtful words can be
Home
School
  • Model Tolerance towards others at home.
  • Notice and challenge any expression of racism on TV, social networking, in your community etc with your children.
  • Talk to your child that racism is socially and legally unacceptable and recognise the consequences.
  • Help your child understand that racist humour can hurt others.
  • Reinforce a positive culture of acceptance of other people’s culture, religion, colour, and customs.
  • All staff to pick up and challenge any racist comment or humour by anyone, child or adult, in or out of school.
  • Discuss with the child that racist language and humour in the media is not to be repeated in society as it causes offence.
  • Automatic sanction of a minus for racist language or behaviour. Child to see Headmaster. Tutor or Head of Year will contact parents of all children involved in the racist incident.
  • Regular discussion in Circle Time or assembly etc.
  • Use all support in school, Tutors, Head of Years, Pastoral Team, Houseparents to support all children involved in racist incident.
  • Make clear to children that if they hear racist language being used they have a responsibility to challenge it and report it to a teacher.
  • Use PSHE, Circle Time and the School Council to discuss and be proactive in keeping the school community safe

No time for breakfast:

We can help children understand that breakfast is the most important meal of the day and gives them the energy they need to see them through the morning. A good breakfast helps maintain concentration, improve memory skills and encourages good eating habits. Initially, if a child is not used to having breakfast they will be very reluctant to eat. However, this will change as it becomes a daily routine. 
Home
School
  • Model the eating of breakfast to your child.
  • Set the alarm for ten minutes earlier to enable them to have time to eat at home.
  • Give children a selection of breakfast foods to choose from. (if they like it, they are more likely to eat it.)
  • Have the uniform laid out, the bag packed and the breakfast table set the previous evening to give you more time in the morning.
  • On those mornings when you are running late, provide a breakfast snack (eg cereal bars, nuts and dried fruit, fruit smoothie, breakfast sandwiches, fruit and a yoghurt) that children can eat in the car on the way to school.
  • Some parents arrive at school before the start of the school day and use this time to have breakfast together.
  • With children, recognise how they feel and how hard it is to concentrate when they have missed breakfast, emphasising what an important meal it is.
  • Help children think about how they can help themselves eg by laying out breakfast before they go to bed (or, if younger, helping mum or dad to do this)
  • Discuss that our bodies are like cars that need fuel and what foods constitute a healthy breakfast eg porridge for slow release energy.
  • Contact parents when children say they have missed breakfast.

Sexist remarks and behaviour:

We can help children respect their own and other people's bodies, gender and sexuality
Home
School
  • Model Tolerance towards others at home.
  • Notice and challenge any expression of sexism on TV, social networking, in your community etc with your children.
  • Talk to your child that sexism is socially unacceptable and recognise the consequences.
  • Talk to your child that certain sexist language and acts are legally unacceptable and recognise the consequences. Eg sexting, “de-bagging”
  • Help your child understand that sexist humour can hurt others.
  • Reinforce a positive culture of acceptance of other people’s sexuality
  • All staff to pick up and challenge any sexist comment, action or humour by anyone, child or adult, in or out of school.
  • Discuss with the child that sexist language, action and humour in the media is not to be repeated in society as it causes offence.
  • Automatic sanction of a minus for sexist language or behaviour.
  • Child directing the sexist language/behaviour to see Senior Designated Person for Safeguarding to explain the seriousness of the incident. Child receiving the sexist language/behaviour to see Senior Designated Person for Safeguarding to reassure and give them the chance to discuss their feelings.
  • Child directing the sexist language/behaviour to see Headmaster.
  • Tutor or Head of Year will contact parents of all children involved in the incident.
  • Regular discussion in Circle Time or assembly etc.
  • Use all support in school, Tutors, Head of Years, Pastoral Team, Houseparents to support all children involved in sexist incident.
  • Make clear to children that if they hear sexist language or behaviour being used they have a responsibility to challenge it and report it to a teacher.
  • Use PSHE, Circle Time and the School Council to discuss and be proactive in keeping the school community safe

Counselling

Our counselling service which provides support within an overall school strategy can be highly effective in promoting children's welfare, supporting their learning and achievement as well as alleviating and preventing the escalation of mental health problems. Counsellors who are part of a whole school approach to emotional health and wellbeing are able to recognise and support children who are at risk, in need, vulnerable or for whom there are potential mental health risks. 

The counsellor can offer a child a safe and supportive environment to talk over difficult issues in confidence and will listen to views, experiences and feelings without judgement in an atmosphere of respect and empathy. 

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